Common Disorders
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Did you know the foot has 28 bones, 37 joints, 107 ligaments, 19 muscles, and numerous tendons? These parts all work together to allow the foot to move in a variety of ways while balancing your weight and propelling you forward or backward on even or uneven surfaces. It is no wonder that most Americans will experience a foot problem that will require the care of a specialist at one point or another in their lifetime.

Ankle sprains are one of the most common joint injuries runners experience. The injury can occur when one rolls over a rock, lands off a curb, or steps in a small hole or crack in the road. Usually the sprain is only mild, but on occasion it may seriously injure the ligaments or tendons surrounding the ankle joint. Management of this injury relies on early and accurate diagnosis, as well as an aggressive rehabilitation program directed toward reducing acute symptoms, maintaining ankle stability, and returning the runner to pre-injury functional level.

General Anatomy of the Ankle

The ankle is comprised of three main bones: the talus (from the foot), the fibula and tibia (from the lower leg). The three bones together form a mortise (on the top of the talus), as well as two joint areas (on the inside and outside of the ankle), sometimes called the "gutters". The ankle is surrounded by a capsule, as well as tissue (the synovium) that feed it blood and oxygen.

Dislocating peroneal tendons are an uncommon injury to a group of two tendons whose muscles originate on the outside of the calves. These two muscles are named the Peroneus Brevis and Peroneus Longus. These two muscles are responsible for eversion of the foot. This movement of the foot is demonstrated by standing and then rolling to the outside of the foot. These tendons are also called "stirrup" tendons because as they pass into the foot they act as a stirrup to help hold up the arch of the foot. As these tendons pass behind the outside ankle bone, called the fibula, they are held in place by a band of tissue called the peroneal retinaculum. Injury to the retinaculum can cause it to stretch or even tear. When this occurs the peroneal tendons can dislocate from their groove on the back of the fibula. The tendons can be seen to roll over the outside of the fibula. This will cause the tendons to function abnormally and can cause damage to the tendons. Dislocating peroneal tendons most commonly occur as a result of injury during participation in athletic activities. The most common sport causing injury is snow skiing. It can also occur while playing football, basketball, and soccer. This injury can occur in non-athletes, as a result of a severe ankle sprain. The injury typically results in a popping or sharp pain on the outside of the ankle. The outside of the ankle is called the lateral malleolus. Commonly however, there may be little to no discomfort at the time of injury, which later becomes symptomatic.

A fall, an accident, or a hard blow may cause one or more bones in the ankle to fracture or break. Depending on the type of injury, an ankle may fracture in several ways. Spiral fractures may result from twisting injuries. If bone pulls away from bone, the break is often straight. After a bad fall, or a heavy blow, bone may be crushed. Although ankle fractures tend to cause pain, you may be able to walk on the ankle. However, this is not a good idea. Your physician should check any injured ankle.

Treatment

Your treatment depends on where and how badly your ankle has been broken. Your physician will feel your ankle and foot for swelling and any displaced bones. He or she may also check to see if the ankle joint still moves. Depending on how the injury occurred, your physician may examine your leg from the knee down. X-rays will be taken to show the type of break, its exact location, and the extent of the damage.

After a fracture, a cast may be used to hold the bone in its proper position for healing. Sometimes the sections of broken bone must first be realigned. This is called reduction. The type of reduction is based on how far the bone has moved from its normal position.